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PostPosted: Mon Oct 22, 2012 6:25 am 
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I thought I had a thread for this somewhere, but evidently not... I figured it'd be useful to link to some useful and/or interesting papers relevant to worldbuilding (including stellar evolution, orbital dynamics, planet formation, planetary migration, atmospheres etc).

Here's one I found discussing the Circumstellar Habitable Zones of Binary Star Systems in the Solar Neighborhood.

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PostPosted: Mon Oct 22, 2012 4:48 pm 
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This paper http://arxiv.org/abs/0707.2895 provides a very neat mass radius relationship for planets. Though it probably needs a little unpacking.

This though http://arxiv.org/abs/1102.0396 is probably a little too speculative for this thread. It proposes that the Earths water (or at least the hydrogen component) came from the sun, which is precisely the sort of scientific theory I like.


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PostPosted: Mon Oct 22, 2012 11:55 pm 
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Just to be clear, this thread is for useful papers, right? Ones that contain data that we might want to refer to, and not merely conclusions that we rely on or matter that is interesting. So a link to the paper that concludes that the atmosphere of a tidally-locked planet in the life zone of a red dwarf will not freeze out does not belong here, but one that diagrams the climatic zones of a tidally-locked habitable planet does. Correct?

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PostPosted: Tue Oct 23, 2012 3:46 am 
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Yeah, I was wondering about that. Thinking about it, I'll move this to the Worldbuilding board so it's more directly relevant to worldbuilding... but I figured it'd be good to have a place where people could post links to papers that could prove useful for that subject. I think both the examples you mention would be OK - the first paper could still have some handy equations in it after all, and it's relevant to deciding where to place tidelocked worlds.

So the answer i guess is... useful and/or interesting worldbuilding papers go here. I guess that if people find other interesting papers on generally SF-relevant topics then they can go on a separate thread.

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PostPosted: Thu Oct 25, 2012 11:17 pm 
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Fogg, M. J. and Nelson, R. P., 2008 Terrestrial planet formation in low-eccentricity warm-Jupiter systems.
  • Detailed simulations show that the building blocks for terrestrial planets in the habitable zone are likely to survive the transit of inward-migrating hot Jupiters.

Heng, K., Menou, K. and Phillipps, P.J., 2010, Atmospheric circulation of tidally-locked exoplanets: a suite of benchmark tests for dynamical solvers.
  • Includes simulation results for temperature and wind on a hypothetical analogue of Earth with synchronous rotation.

Joshi, M. M., Haberle, R. M., and Reynolds, R. T., 1997 Simulations of the Atmospheres of Synchronously Rotating Terrestrial Planets Orbiting M Dwarfs: Conditions for Atmospheric Collapse and the Implications for Habitability.
  • Classic paper showing that an atmosphere of half a bar of CO2 on a tide-locked terrestrial planet orbiting an M dwarf would not freeze out. Since oxygen and nitrogen freeze less readily than CO2, and a denser atmosphere would transport heat to the dark side even better, a breatheable atmosphere would not freeze out either. Does not discuss whether the water would all freeze out on the dark side.

Merlis, T.M. and Schneider, T., 2010 Atmospheric dynamics of Earth-like tidally locked aquaplanets.
  • Temperature, wind, and rain on a tidally-locked planet covered by a shallow ocean (oceanic transport of heat is not modelled). Contrasts slow-rotating and fast-rotating extremes (24-hour year and 8760-hour year).

Miguel, Y., Guilera, O. M. and Brunini, A., 2011 The Diversity of Planetary Systems Architectures: Contrasting Theory with Observations.
  • What kinds of arrangement of different planets do we expect to see, and where do the habitable planets go?

Morbidelli, A., Lunine, J.I., O’Brien, D.P., Raymond, S.N. and Walsh, K. J., 2012 Building Terrestrial Planets.
  • Survey of the current position on accretion, late giant collisions, giant planet architecture, the Grand Tack scenario, and the origin of terrestrial water.

Pravec, P., Harris, A.W., and Michalowski, T., ?date?, Asteroid Rotations
  • Gives the distribution of rates of rotation for small and large asteroids, establishing a probable distribution of rates of rotation for bodies unaffected by tidal braking. This corrects the erroneous impression, obtained from considering moons, that small bodies rotate slower than large ones.

Raymond, S.N., Quinn, T., and Lunine, J.I., 2003 Making other earths: dynamical simulations of terrestrial planet formation and water delivery.
  • Simulations of the accretion of planetary embryos with their compositions initially depending on condensation temperature at their distance from the star show that after gravitational perturbation of their orbits the water can end up anywhere.

Showman, A.P, Cho, J. Y.-K., Menou, K., 2009, Atmospheric Circulation of Exoplanets.
  • Formidable equations, interesting diagrams of simulation results. Very illuminating on the topic of the climate of slowly-rotating worlds.

Tarter, J. et al., 2007 A Reappraisal of the Habitability of Planets Around M Dwarf Stars.
  • Report of conference on the suitability of M dwarf stars as the primaries of habitable planets.

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Last edited by Agemegos on Fri Oct 26, 2012 5:23 am, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Fri Oct 26, 2012 4:04 am 
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Cool, thanks! one of these days I'll go through my papers and find links to them. I've got Sean Raymond's PhD thesis somewhere... I think he published all of it as individual papers eventually.

Incidentally, whenever anyone posts links to papers, please try to link to a direct download of the paper (e.g. arxiv, the author's website) or failing that a summary article/press release for it? I'd rather not list papers here that are behind journal paywalls or anything like that. Thanks! :)

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PostPosted: Tue Oct 30, 2012 10:11 am 
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That paper by Miguel et al. is a especially significant. It concludes that hot and warm Jupiters will be confined to systems with high metallicity, and that we should expect to find a lot of systems with multiple terrestrial planets but no giants, which will be especially common in systems with low metallicity.

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PostPosted: Thu Nov 01, 2012 6:35 am 
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Raymond, S. N., Quinn, T., & Lunine, J. I., 2005 The formation and habitability of terrestrial planets in the presence of close-in giant planets.
  • Extensive modelling of Type I and Type II migration of fast-forming gas giants through a belt of planetismals in the inner system concludes that terrestrial planets may form in systems with hot or warm Jupiters, and indicates where the asteroid belts and the water ought to be.

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PostPosted: Sun Nov 04, 2012 2:44 am 
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A couple of papers I found while trying to get a bit more precise in how I used the Hill radius. One offers a neat definitive answer with coeeficients for how far outwards and inwards from a planet to place the next stable orbits. The other says that the Hill radius is not all that useful. Guess which one I will choose to work from.

ON THE VALIDITY OF THE “HILL RADIUS CRITERION” FOR THE EJECTION OF PLANETS FROM STELLAR HABITABLE ZONES by M. Cuntz and K. E. Yeager

PREDICTING PLANETS IN KEPLER MULTI-PLANET SYSTEMS by Julia Fang and Jean-Luc Margot


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PostPosted: Sun Nov 04, 2012 3:00 am 
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Andrew M wrote:
Guess which one I will choose to work from.

The one with the more convincing evidence and reasoning?

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