SFRPG

The forum for Science Fiction Role Playing Game inspiration and information! So Say We All!
It is currently Tue Dec 12, 2017 4:03 pm

All times are UTC




Post new topic  Reply to topic  [ 6 posts ] 
Author Message
PostPosted: Wed Sep 21, 2011 11:58 pm 
Offline
Administrator
User avatar

Joined: Thu Jul 03, 2008 1:22 am
Posts: 5296
http://arxiv.org/abs/1109.4141

tl dr; binaries with a separation of < 40 AU probably won't have planets.

_________________
SFRPG Owner/Admin
This post (or any other post I made here) may not be quoted or copied beyond the SF RPG boards without my explicit permission.
Check out the latest news from Spica Publishing!
evildrganymede.net - visit the The Worldbuilding Hub, and check out my Science Blog!


Top
   
PostPosted: Thu Sep 22, 2011 12:49 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Tue Jul 08, 2008 8:42 pm
Posts: 2667
Location: Texas, USA
Then how does the article account for the recently discovered saturn-sized planet orbiting around a binary pair with a separation of 0.2 AU? The planet orbits at about 0.8 AU.

_________________
My friends call me Richard. You can call me Sir.
www.XmasDragon.com


Top
   
PostPosted: Thu Sep 22, 2011 2:20 pm 
Offline

Joined: Sun Aug 28, 2011 10:22 am
Posts: 25
Cyborg IM1 wrote:
Then how does the article account for the recently discovered saturn-sized planet orbiting around a binary pair with a separation of 0.2 AU? The planet orbits at about 0.8 AU.


I believe there are mechanisms for planetary orbits to migrate inwards after forming, e.g. due to braking. Alternatively that discovery may not be accurate - these planetary orbital parameters are inferred from related observations. I'm skeptical about the stability of that one - though I don't know the details.


Top
   
PostPosted: Thu Sep 22, 2011 4:27 pm 
Offline
Administrator
User avatar

Joined: Thu Jul 03, 2008 1:22 am
Posts: 5296
I think this paper is about planets orbiting individual stars separated by up to 40 AU (I guess this would be what Traveller called "Near binaries"), not orbiting both stars in the binary.

_________________
SFRPG Owner/Admin
This post (or any other post I made here) may not be quoted or copied beyond the SF RPG boards without my explicit permission.
Check out the latest news from Spica Publishing!
evildrganymede.net - visit the The Worldbuilding Hub, and check out my Science Blog!


Top
   
PostPosted: Thu Sep 22, 2011 4:35 pm 
Offline

Joined: Sun Sep 07, 2008 12:06 am
Posts: 360
EDG wrote:
http://arxiv.org/abs/1109.4141

tl dr; binaries with a separation of < 40 AU probably won't have planets.

For comparison, where is 40 AU in our solar system?

_________________
I really love Classic Traveller, especially without the Imperium ... There, I said it.
Now pass me a laser carbine and a couple of extra battery clips.


Top
   
PostPosted: Thu Sep 22, 2011 5:20 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Thu Jul 03, 2008 1:08 am
Posts: 3107
Location: Sonthofen / Germany
atpollard wrote:
For comparison, where is 40 AU in our solar system?

The semi-major axis of Pluto's orbit is at about 39 AU, so 40 AU
would be truly far out for a planet, but it is still very close for
a companion star.


Top
   
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic  Reply to topic  [ 6 posts ] 

All times are UTC


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
cron
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Limited