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PostPosted: Fri Jan 17, 2014 6:02 pm 
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[2300AD] New blog post! I've been looking at the original 2300AD star and worldgen system to discover its idiosyncracies and see how it compares to reality. In this first part of the series, I discuss the issues and present some results from some automated worldgen runs (Part 2 - in which I try to solve the issues - will be posted soon!). http://evildrganymede.net/2014/01/17/gd ... em-part-1/

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PostPosted: Fri Jan 17, 2014 8:15 pm 
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Good stuff. I always wondered why they called Earth's atmosphere "dense" instead of "standard" in that game, but maybe the design philosophy was that Earthlike worlds are unusual and the most common, "standard" type is thinner.

After learning about the BBT impact on MMW I wondered how hard it'd be to create a not-complicated fix, so I'm very interested in seeing how you address it.

I would suppose that quite a lot of the garden worlds you generated would be tide-locked around a type-M star. I can't remember what the thinking is on that right now? Likely to be habitable or no? Either way I would imagine that your edited version will produce far fewer than 1 garden world in 25 systems. Makes for a lot of systems where there's only a gas station and maybe an Applebees.


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PostPosted: Fri Jan 17, 2014 9:00 pm 
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The solution to the MMW problem was just to calculate it :) - that requires you to also calculate the BB temperature and the mass of the planet too.

And yes, all of the M V and most of the K V habitable worlds are going to be tidelocked. I still have to actually put that into the program actually, I just have to figure out the maximum distance from the star where worlds are more likely to be tidelocked though. I'd imagine that tidelocking reduces the practical habitability of a planet somewhat and makes it harder to live there, but I don't assume that it renders a habitable world completely uninhabitable.

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PostPosted: Fri Jan 24, 2014 5:50 pm 
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EDG wrote:
I'd imagine that tidelocking reduces the practical habitability of a planet somewhat and makes it harder to live there, but I don't assume that it renders a habitable world completely uninhabitable.
Reading about Venus recently made me wonder whether tidelocked worlds might be subject to the same sort of effects that drive out all of the water and hydrogen as Venus was. I thought that if the sunpole is hot then all of the water there will be encouraged to become vapor, disassociate and the hydrogen blown away by the solar winds.

Is a tidelocked world likely to have a spinning molten core to generate a magnetosphere to protect the atmosphere?

It seems that tidelocked worlds may be doomed to be lifeless and Venus-like.

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PostPosted: Fri Jan 24, 2014 7:38 pm 
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A strong magnetosphere would be unlikely, but a weak one is a possibility (Mercury has one). Since their 'rotation period' would be equal to their orbital period around their star, it could be possible for tidelocked worlds around red/orange dwarfs to generate a stronger field if that 'rotation' can drive their core dynamo - but I don't know if that's really likely or not.

Also, remember that tidelocked worlds don't necessarily have to have a scorching desert on the dayside - that's only if they're near the inner edge or middle of the habitable zone (depending on their land/sea layout too). If it's nearer the outer edge of the habitable zone it might actually be pleasant or even cold on the dayside (the rest of the planet would be colder though - the 'twilight zone' at the terminator may be ice-covered and the ice could extend out into the dayside quite far, with only the subsolar point and the region around that being ice-free.

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PostPosted: Sat Feb 01, 2014 7:44 am 
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[2300AD] The second (final) part of my examination of the 2300AD worldbuilding system is up! In this article I describe the fixes I came up with to make the system more realistic, and present the results of some 100k runs and some sample systems to show what the output looks like! http://evildrganymede.net/2014/02/01/gd ... em-part-2/

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PostPosted: Sat Feb 01, 2014 1:35 pm 
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Q about the snow line: if you move it from 5 to 2.5, then that does that mean in our own system Ceres and Vesta and all those little guys would technically have icy cores?

I wonder what kind of economic impact this revised ratio of garden worlds would have. Presumably you'd have to build a lot more outposts to support traveling ships, since the distance between garden worlds would be much farther. It would cost a lot more to establish and supply a colony.

Also, every time I look at your profile pic, I think, man, it's so cool that Dr. Rush is sharing all this info with us.


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PostPosted: Sat Feb 01, 2014 6:22 pm 
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I think asteroid belts at the border of the Outer/Middle zone are more likely to be a mix of rocky and icy bodies - particularly our own since they've been jumbled up by Jupiter's limited in/out migrations.

And yeah, Rush was my favourite character in SGU. In fact he's one of my favourite characters in anything ever :)

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PostPosted: Wed Feb 05, 2014 5:20 pm 
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Regarding the 2300 assumption that gas giants do not snowball within the snow line, is it reasonable to assume that gas giants closer to a star would be larger if they'd remained in the outer system? Maybe the opportunity to roll more dice for diameter addresses that well enough.

If capping GGs at around Jupiter size, then the roll for snowballing might make more sense as 1d3-1, giving you 0/1/2 doublings. You wouldn't get too many results that exceed that cap.

Maybe you say this someplace and I missed it, but I would also think that if you get a GG for an inner/lifezone planet with your roll, it makes more sense to use the icy core density. Otherwise you might get a Neptune-size world that's 100 earth masses.


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PostPosted: Wed Feb 05, 2014 5:37 pm 
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I suspect that changing the doubling rolls to 0-2 might just end up giving us lots of small gas giants. I think the GGs are OK here - we still get a mass range from sub-neptune up to about 8 Jupiter masses.

And the gas giants snowball outside the inner zone - so you can still have big gas giants in the habitable and middle zone. I don't even know if it generated that many inner zone gas giants either - without snowballing then at most they're going to be about Neptune sized (30,000 km) and I suspect at least half of them would be Failed Cores (< 12,000 km).

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